Website trends are just like fashion. Each year, new styles come in and old looks become quickly outdated. On the web, this can have a big impact on your business’ ability to stay competitive and attract new customers.

With this in mind, we’ve pulled together some of the biggest emerging trends for 2013 – in both form and function – to help you stay ahead of the game and grow your business all year long.

A few key takeaways from the infographic below:

1. Mobile browsing on tablets and smartphones continues to grow by leaps and bounds. Responsive design — websites that self-adjust for different screens — will be big.


After all the time you’ve spent creating a logo, gathering everything you need for your website, and designing the perfect homepage, you might be tempted to throw together a contact page quickly and call it a day. But before you pop the cork on that “I just finished my website” Champagne, consider the original purpose of your small business website. Isn’t it to turn visitors into leads, and lose leads into customers?

Let’s put that bubbly on ice and take a closer look at the humble contact page, and some guidelines you should follow to put it to work for your business.


During our How To Make A Website series, you’ve learnedthe pieces of a website, you’ve gathered everything you need to make a website, and you’ve planned out the perfect homepage. Now that you have all of your information together, you need to choose the best way to display it all.

Choosing typography for websites can be a full-time job. But if you keep it simple and follow the rules below, you can end up with a great, user-friendly website that your visitors will love.


Our series on How To Make a Website continues with tips for optimizing the most important part: the homepage.

Your site’s homepage is typically the first — and sometimes last — page of your site that visitors will see. So make it count!

Before we get into the details, let’s start with some broad advice. Before designing anything, make sure you understand your website’s target audience. Who are they? What are they looking for? You’ve likely already thought about these questions when branding your company in the first place, so make sure that your website reflects your brand and you should be in good shape.


Since we began this week talking about user-friendly website navigation in our How To Make a Website series, it’s only fitting that today’s Webs user Example Site should set, well, a good example.

RentMatrix, an online rental payment solution, has a clean and easy to navigate website that provides plenty of information in an organized fashion. There are a number of things going right with their navigation:

First, there are just 6 options to click on, and only one level of navigation. As we said in Monday’s blog post, multiple navigation levels can be a great way to organize and prioritize information for visitors if you have a lot of it. However, if you can slim down your content to fit on just a primary level, it’s much easier for visitors to see what’s available at a glance.


Our series on building a website continues! Last time we talked we broke down the pieces of a website, and today we are diving into one of the most important: your site’s navigation.

Good, intuitive navigation is arguably the most important element of a successful website. If visitors come to your website and they’re unable to find what they want, they’re going to leave, and all the splashy homepages and cool graphics in the world won’t bring them back

So today we’re going to talk about the basic Dos and Don’ts of user-friendly web navigation for your personal or small business website.


We recently talked about how to make your small business website a success in 2013 in our 10 Steps To a Successful Business Website post.

What? You haven’t created a website for your small business yet? You’re not alone. By now, almost every small business owner is aware of the importance of having a website, but many haven’t taken the plunge yet because they feel overwhelmed by the process. One of the best ways to combat this is to break it down into small steps and collect everything you’ll need before you tackle your new site.


With the New Year just around the corner, it’s time to get serious about a resolution to make your small business website a success. Not sure where to start? You’re in luck! We’ve made a list (and checked it twice) to help you get on track for your business’s best year yet.

1. Get a custom domain name. We don’t mean to harp, but this is a big one. Having your own domain shows customers that you take your business seriously, and they should too.

2. Create a custom email address. Another benefit of having your own domain name is the ability to have a custom email address, like email @ Do you want your customers hearing from your old Hotmail address? Probably not.


We’re halfway through the week people, which means it’s time for another edition of Example Site Wednesday.

Today’s site is from a technology support company in Las Vegas, Nevada called Technician Platoon. What stands out most about this site is how well this Webs user has employed layout and organization to convey a good deal of information in an effective way.

We’ve talked before about how imagery can be very important on a website to create visual interest. The exception to that rule, however, is the company whose industry does not lend itself to good imagery. The options in that situation always seem to come down to a site packed with unattractive or irrelevant images, or a small business website that is essentially just a Word document hosted online.


As we talked about last week, there are a lot of myths out there about building a website — from the price to the timeline to the level of skill you need.

The answers to people’s questions about website creation vary greatly though, depending on the route you take to build it. Many people still go with the old standard method of working with various professionals. Increasingly, however, individuals and small businesses are striking out on their own and using DIY website builders (like…say…Webs SiteBuilder).



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