Customer Service Vector

We recently touched on the importance of customer experience and how companies large and small are tuning into this relatively new business area. However, with the advent of customer experience, we can’t forget about good old customer service. Customer service is a company’s backbone, and plays a central part in any business’s success. Yet, in these ever-changing times, traditional customer service methodologies are no longer making the cut. Customers have higher expectations, there is greater competition in the market, and support is no longer an ancillary entity, but rather an integral part of the customer experience. As consumer demands increase, innovating with the changing atmosphere is necessary.  As a small business, it’s the time to up the ante and refresh your customer service strategy.



Assuming you have a valuable proposition, there’s only one thing that can stop your users from converting: trust. If a user trusts your brand, they’ll gladly partake in an exchange with you. However, building that trust is no easy feat—it takes consistently good service across multiple recurring transactions and exchanges, sometimes spanning months or years, before a user intrinsically trusts your brand.

The Time Problem

This doesn’t do you much good considering most users entering your website will form a lasting first impression of your brand based on their first eight seconds of activity. Provided you get lucky enough to win a first-timer’s business, you can build trust with your level of service, but how can you build trust from the very first interaction, with no prior user knowledge of your brand or product?



Whether online or offline, a customer’s first time experience with your business is incredibly important and has a very large impact on the likelihood that they return again.

On average, loyal customers are worth up to 10 times as much as their first purchase. (White House Office of Consumer Affairs)

So how can you ensure that wherever new customers discover your business they get the first time experience they deserve and that will keep them coming back? Just follow these five techniques and you’ll own your customers’ first time experience.


Repeat business graphic

Businesses that generate 40% or more of their sales with repeat customers have almost 50% higher revenue than companies with low levels of repeat business. So how do you get your customers to come back? Here are six ways to drive up your repeat business percentage.

Encourage an Initial High-Dollar Purchase
According to market analytics company SumAll, there is a direct correlation between the dollar amount of a customer’s first purchase and the probability they will return to buy from you again. You see this principle in action with cosmetics companies, for example.


Price increase icon

Over the past 15 years, Netflix has built what is likely the most successful subscription service of all time.  Their users are incredibly engaged, fiercely loyal, and absolutely love the service.

However, despite this incredibly deep connection with their subscribers, users revolted when Netflix tried to dramatically increase their prices and fundamentally alter their suite of products.  Over the next 4 months, the company lost 800,000 subscribers and its stock price fell 77%.


Video about ad cliches

The Inbox Diaries is a new series designed to help busy entrepreneurs keep up with all the latest news in small business, marketing, and social media. I’m scouring my inbox every day for interesting tidbits – so you don’t have to.

This Week’s Stories:

Avoid The Clichés Featured In This Hilarious Video
Have you ever seen a field full of wind turbines in a commercial for a washing machine and wondered “what does this have to do with getting my whites whiter?” Then the video below might be for you. According to Mashable, this video comes from the stock video provider Dissolve, and was perhaps created to encourage its clients to advertise responsibly.




Over the past few weeks, we’ve talked on the Pagemodo blog about how to build a social media brand that matches your business and how to optimize your social media strategy to gain the most followers, shares, likes, and ultimately the most customers.

Once you’ve built a strong foundation of followers on Facebook and Twitter, it’s time to take a look at who these people are:

  • Do they match your typical customer profile (Gender, Age, and Location)?
  • Or, do these social media followers look much different?

Wouldn’t it be great to know which of these followers are the most valuable or has the most influence over other prospect customers just like them?  Thanks to simple-to-use tools from Social Rank and Klout, you can!


Today’s article is a guest post from Greg Ciotti of Help Scout.

Great customer support should always be available, even when you are not.

In other words, sometimes the best thing you can do for your customers is to simply get out of the way.

This is a trend we’ve seen take over in 2013, and I’m confident that next year will see continuing adoption and recognition of the sincere usefulness of self-service.

Why? So many aspects of business and commerce are moving online, and with this 24-hour customer base (that spans the world over), it’s impossible for small companies to have live options for support all the time.


Today’s article is a guest post from Webs’ Search Marketing Specialist, Collin Tate.

Originally this post was going to be about my experiences with Zappos, how awesome they are and how businesses both large and small should aspire to completely own customer service the way that Zappos does. Instead, I’m going to chat about an unexpected hero, and how going above and beyond typical customer service creates bonds and develops customer loyalty.

If you’ve ever owned a computer, you know how frustrating it is when things stop working. There’s little worse than when you have an accidental drop, you get a virus, when hardware fails or kids or pets get their little hands or paws on your computer. If you’re like me, you first try to troubleshoot the issue alone. When that doesn’t work, you call a family member or friend who knows their way around computers, hoping that they can fix your problem, all the while praying that you don’t have to call tech support.


Today’s article is a guest post from legal blogger Matt Faustman.

Every year, MSN Money surveys adults about the quality of customer service at 150 of the best-known companies across the country and in 15 industries to find the MSN Money Customer Service Hall of Shame winners. The survey is now in its seventh year and the year-over-year industries that have acquired a bad rap for poor customer service remain the same. In the end, we dislike the banks, the cable television providers, and the credit card companies the most.



Layout Style

Header Style

Accent Color