As the holidays approach, charitable organizations are really starting to ramp up their outreach and marketing in order to capitalize on the ‘season of giving’ to come. If you’ve ever considered philanthropy or charitable marketing as a strategy for your business, now may be the perfect time to think of creative ways to get involved.

What are the benefits of charitable marketing for your business? There are several. One being that it builds goodwill for your business and establishes positive associations for your brand. (We posted a full article on branding through philanthropy awhile back that might be helpful.) Charitable marketing is also a great way to gain exposure for your business by leveraging the audience and trading on the recognition of another brand — the charity itself. Finally, your charitable activities give you something new to talk about on social media, in your own email marketing, in press releases, and elsewhere, in order to drum up traffic to your website and your store.


If you don’t have the budget for glossy magazine advertising or high-profile online ad placement, you might still be able to achieve the results you’re looking for (without spending big bucks) through industry newsletters and listservs.

Think about your target market for a minute. Who are they? Where do they get their news? What groups might they be a part of? What communications are they already receiving that you might piggyback on? There are three big advantages to advertising and partnerships of this kind:


For today’s post in our series on creating community around your business, we’ll turn to Webs’ Head of Marketing, Rochelle, to hear about her first-hand experience with a local charitable organization.

It can be really difficult to think of new ways to create community around your small business–especially when you have your hands full with so many other tasks and demands.  One of the most effective community-creating strategies I’ve seen in action is in-kind donations: donating your business’s services or goods to other organizations (specifically non-profits) that can benefit from them.


Many businesses have discovered the benefits of marketing tactics that build community, like sponsorships, in-kind donations, and rewards programs. But some organizations make offline community events such an integral part of their strategy that their outreach takes on a brand of its own.

What is the advantage of this? For one thing, having your business or organization visible in as many arenas as possible is always a good thing — online, social, offline, etc. Also, offline tactics tend to appeal to more than just your core target audience, allowing you to access people you might not otherwise have found.


Whether they’re introducing a new company or trying to drive new customers to an established business, small business owners face a similar marketing challenge: how to maximize the impact of their campaigns without breaking the bank.

Because small businesses are just that — small — every dollar of the funding they’ve drummed up must be spent wisely. And while studies show that marketing spend among small businesses is up, it’s still necessary to find new and different ways to get across a marketing message outside of the traditional (read: expensive) advertising media.



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