Here in Silver Spring, Maryland it’s a pretty dreary day. So today’s Webs user Example Site post will attempt to add a brighten things up a little by featuring The Beachcat Sail Company of Reno, Nevada!

Beachcat sells customized sailing vessels through their website, and they have done a fantastic job of setting up their web store and supporting sales throughout their site. We’re going to take it piece by piece and talk about what makes it so successful.

Reasons To Believe
Whenever a business decides to sell a product, part of their marketing plan should be coming up with their unique selling proposition, or the best “reasons to believe” for their potential customers. Beachcat shares these right up front on their homepage, citing their outstanding design and performance and their premium materials.


As the proud owner of a small business website, you’ve done your best to make your website attractive and easy to use. You’ve set up a welcoming homepage, made sure to have user-friendly navigation, and even optimized your contact page. Yep, any potential customer sitting at their computer would be happy to browse your site. But what about the ones who aren’t at home?

You’ve likely heard a lot by now about the importance of having a mobile version of your website. You’re well aware that smartphones are now approaching the audience size of PC, (eMarketer) and that mobile users browse your site under totally different conditions, requiring a different set of design rules. If you’re a Webs user, you’re in luck — a mobile version of your site is automatically generated in your account. For tips on making the most of this version, check out this post on how to optimize your mobile site.


There was a time not too long ago when people thought of blogs and websites as two distinctly different things. The purpose of a website was to promote products and services and provide static information. A blog was a type of website that featured articles or journal-like entries that people would bookmark or subscribe to and read periodically.

Today, websites and blogs have a much closer relationship, and frequently occupy the same space. A blog has become an invaluable tool for driving traffic, and therefore has become a permanent fixture of an increasing number of small business websites.


Website trends are just like fashion. Each year, new styles come in and old looks become quickly outdated. On the web, this can have a big impact on your business’ ability to stay competitive and attract new customers.

With this in mind, we’ve pulled together some of the biggest emerging trends for 2013 – in both form and function – to help you stay ahead of the game and grow your business all year long.

A few key takeaways from the infographic below:

1. Mobile browsing on tablets and smartphones continues to grow by leaps and bounds. Responsive design — websites that self-adjust for different screens — will be big.


In last week’s example site post, we looked at the practice of displaying clients’ logos as a way to lend credibility to your business and services. But what if your business doesn’t service other companies? That’s where testimonials and reviews come in.

These types of ‘credibility indicators’ are a great way to increase conversions via your website — however you define a conversion. This may mean purchasing an item, signing up for a service, making a reservation, or sending you an inquiry.


After all the time you’ve spent creating a logo, gathering everything you need for your website, and designing the perfect homepage, you might be tempted to throw together a contact page quickly and call it a day. But before you pop the cork on that “I just finished my website” Champagne, consider the original purpose of your small business website. Isn’t it to turn visitors into leads, and lose leads into customers?

Let’s put that bubbly on ice and take a closer look at the humble contact page, and some guidelines you should follow to put it to work for your business.


It’s Wednesday afternoon, which means it’s time to look at another great example site built by a Webs user!

This week we’re looking at Neville Hopwood Photography. There are lots of great things about Neville’s site; from big, beautiful images to clean navigation and layout. What we want to focus on today is his use of logos on the About page.

There are a few good ways to toot your own horn on your website and lend a little more credibility to your services. You can showcase actual customer testimonials, you can supply a list of all your satisfied customers, and — perhaps most visually impactful — you can show the logos of all the big names who’ve hired you in the past.


During our How To Make A Website series, you’ve learnedthe pieces of a website, you’ve gathered everything you need to make a website, and you’ve planned out the perfect homepage. Now that you have all of your information together, you need to choose the best way to display it all.

Choosing typography for websites can be a full-time job. But if you keep it simple and follow the rules below, you can end up with a great, user-friendly website that your visitors will love.


Our series on How To Make a Website continues with tips for optimizing the most important part: the homepage.

Your site’s homepage is typically the first — and sometimes last — page of your site that visitors will see. So make it count!

Before we get into the details, let’s start with some broad advice. Before designing anything, make sure you understand your website’s target audience. Who are they? What are they looking for? You’ve likely already thought about these questions when branding your company in the first place, so make sure that your website reflects your brand and you should be in good shape.


Since we began this week talking about user-friendly website navigation in our How To Make a Website series, it’s only fitting that today’s Webs user Example Site should set, well, a good example.

RentMatrix, an online rental payment solution, has a clean and easy to navigate website that provides plenty of information in an organized fashion. There are a number of things going right with their navigation:

First, there are just 6 options to click on, and only one level of navigation. As we said in Monday’s blog post, multiple navigation levels can be a great way to organize and prioritize information for visitors if you have a lot of it. However, if you can slim down your content to fit on just a primary level, it’s much easier for visitors to see what’s available at a glance.



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