While it’s important for anyone with a successful web presence to also have a good mobile-optimized version of their site, this holds especially true for businesses that sell their products directly over the web.

Currently, US consumers spend almost 1 in every 10 ecommerce dollars using a mobile device (Hubspot).

With that in mind, if you are not offering customers who prefer to browse the web on their mobile phones a way to buy from you, you’re essentially leaving money on the table.


If you even begin typing in a search for spam terms to avoid in email subjects, it becomes immediately clear that email marketers spend a lot of time worrying about getting past spam filters and in front of their readers. But as Hubspot recently pointed out, there are really 2 sets of filters between you sending an email and your contacts reading your message.

The first is the complex filtering system used by email clients, which is sensitive to words, phrases, symbols, and styling (like all CAPS). The second barrier is your contacts’ own filter that determines whether or not they will open your message if it does reach their inbox.


This is the final post in October’s branding series. So far we’ve talked about defining your unique selling proposition, finding your brand’s tone of voice, and reinforcing your brand in your online spaces. Today we’re going to discuss how to protect your brand once you’ve established it.

First, let’s talk about 3 types of protection companies can obtain which are often confusing to new business owners. These are trademarks, patents, and copyrights. According to the United States Patent and Trademark Office, they are defined as follows:


Another Wednesday is upon us, and it’s time for another great example site created by a Webs user. This week we’re featuring the online portfolio of model Patricia Olufemi.

Because a portfolio site is, by definition, a collection of images from different sources, it’s easy for them to turn out quite cluttered. Patricia’s site, on the other hand, is quite elegantly laid out. She uses simply typography, clean image galleries, and uses only the apps and plugins that are really necessary.


Our branding series continues today as we look at how you can reinforce your branding with your digital presence — your website, mobile app, social media, etc.

When people think about “branding” they often think about something concrete and physical, like their identity package. That is to say their logo, letterhead, maybe a font they’ve selected, a tagline they use, things of that nature.

The next level, however, is to translate those elements into your business’s digital life. Now, of course you’re going to put your logo on all of your online spaces. But there are other, more subtle things that companies can do to reinforce their branding that might not be as top of mind.


We’re halfway through the week, which means it’s time for another great Example Site created by a Webs user!

This week’s site is Stockyards Saloon in San Antonio, TX. As a popular live music venue, Stockyards is likely to get a lot of questions from their visitors. It’s heartening to see that they have not fallen into the “leave them wanting more” mentality that many marketers adopt for their websites.

The rationale behind this practice of under-informing your audience is that if you provide all the information your visitors need right there on your website, they have no reason to contact you directly. The thinking there being that if you can just get someone on the phone, you can quickly sell them on what you offer and turn them into a customer.


Throughout October on the Webs blog, we’re talking about branding for your small business. Last week, our infographic offered advice on finding your Unique Selling Proposition. Today, we’re talking about Tone of Voice.

Whether you’re creating a new company from scratch (congratulations!), or you’re re-branding your current one, perhaps the best place to start if your tone of voice.

Primarily, this means the tone and attitude your writing takes on our website, blog and collateral materials. Your tone of voice is also expressed in the visual representations of your company, so make sure they go hand in hand.


Happy Hump Day Everyone!

Images usually make up a sizable portion of a website and can often communicate quicker than words. Therefore its significance, like the images themselves, can almost not be ignored. In this week’s edition of Example Site Wednesday, we will take a look at Design Kandy’s effective use of images and discuss both the importance of using images and how to successfully use them on your website.

Design Kandy is a small business that specializes in both modern and vintage inspired invitations and stationary for a variety of occasions. So, naturally, you would think that its website would use plenty of images to promote its service and preview her products. That‘s exactly what it does. The homepage has just the right amount of vibrant photos that give the visitors a vivid image of the products. Design Kandy avoids the use of too many words and does most of its talking through its images. Also, there is the obvious use of product photos in its web store.


Surprise! You are now the proud owner of a newly-redesigned LinkedIn Company Page. (Assuming that your company already had a LinkedIn presence, since you’re a savvy social marketer.)

While this is exciting news – especially since the networking site previewed the new pages in August for a few top brands – some marketers were caught off guard by the change. Whether you were unplugged from your RSS feeds for a day or two, or neglected to log into your profile last week, your page may look somewhat odd at the moment.



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